February 29, 2012

5 Things Every Web Designer Should Do When Using Photoshop



























If you expect another designer to pick up where you left off, or if you want a developer to build a site off your designs, here are a few things to keep in mind before you hand over that PSD file. It's common courtesy, and it doesn't take long to do these steps. It makes the next person's life a whole lot easier.

1. Name your layers appropriately

Don't leave layers as "Layer 1, 2, … , n" or "Shape n". It's a pain to figure out what layer corresponds to what you see visually. You wouldn't want to randomly select layers to see what is selected.

2. Order your layers properly

It doesn't matter whether you're going top down, bottom up, or left to right, but there should be some sort of structure in which the layers are ordered. The Layer 2 should be close to Layer 1 in proximity and not off into space.

3. Organize layers into folders

If your design involves sections like headers, footers, columns etc, group them. Also, name those folders appropriately, don't just leave them as "Group 1, 2, … , n".

4. Delete unused non-visible layers

These could be part of your thought process or part of an old flow, but if it's not part of the final design, get rid of it, or indicate clearly that they should be ignored. Store them in a group like "unused assets" if you think they may be useful later on. Any non-visible layer that does not contribute to the final design just adds confusion.

5. More layers is better than fewer

It's better to have every design element as a separate layer than having a flat layer. What's the point of having a PSD if you're grouping everything together? A developer may want to extract partial elements later on. It's better practice to have more layers. Just group the layers into groups to organize your file.

These are the basic points every designer should follow. There are more, but I'm just highlighting the ones that cause the most frustration.

February 25, 2012

Put Yourself First


As I get older, I've learnt to step back, look at the big picture, and say no to people and things when I need to. There is always stuff we "have to" do, or want to do, but beyond a certain point, when it sacrifices your health and sanity, it's not worth it. Say no. Push back. Your own happiness and wellbeing is the most important. Sometimes you have to let go of the assumption that you "need to" do [task]. Always listen to your body.

That's all I have to say today.

February 19, 2012

San Diego Marriage Civil Vows






















I couldn't find these vows anywhere else online, and I liked them, so we got a copy from the San Diego County Clerk office, where I got married.

Dear Friends: 
We meet here for the joyful purpose of joining in marriage: 
[Groom's Full Name] & [Bride's Full Name] 
As you begin your journey through life together may I offer, for your consideration, some very important virtues? Among these are: Love, Loyalty, Respect, Trust, and Understanding. These are solid foundations for a happy and enduring home. 
The marriage contract is most solemn and it is not to be approached lightly, but rather thoughtfully, seriously, and with a deep realization of its obligations and responsibilities. 
[First Name of Groom], do you take this woman, [First Name of Bride], to be your lawfully wedded wife? [I Do] Do you promise to love and protect her, to honor and respect her, to keep her in sickness and in health, through the good times, and also through the bad times, forsaking all others, be faithful to her? [I Do] 
[First Name of Bride], do you take this man, [First Name of Groom], to be your lawfully wedded husband? [I Do] Do you promise to love and protect him, to honor and respect him, to keep him in sickness and in health, through the good times, and also through the bad times, forsaking all others, be faithful to him? [I Do] 
You are now about to give each other certain solemn promises. Please turn, face one another, hold both hands, and repeat after me. 
"I [First Name of Groom], take you [First Name of Bride], to be my lawfully wedded wife, to have and to hold, from this day forward, for better or for worse, for richer or for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and cherish." 
"I [First Name of Bride], take you [First Name of Groom] to be my lawfully wedded husband, to have and to hold, from this day forward, for better or for worse, for richer or for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and cherish." 
The ring is a symbol of your marriage, a circle without beginning or end, and a symbol of wholeness, perfection, peach, and unity. 
Would the groom take the bride's ring, place it on her finger, hold it there, and repeat after me... "[First Name of Bride], I give you this ring, as a pledge of my faith and love, and a symbol of our unity." 
Would the bride take the groom's ring, place it on his finger, hold it there, and repeat after me... "[First Name of Groom], I give you this ring, as a pledge of my faith and love, and a symbol of our unity." 
Now that you have joined yourselves in solemn matrimony and have become one, may you sincerely strive, all your lives, to meet this commitment with the same love and devotion that brought you here today. 
By virtue of the authority vested in me as Deputy Commissioner of Civil Marriages, in and for the County of San Diego, I take pleasure in announcing that from this very moment, you are husband and wife. 
You may now kiss the bride...

I'm not sure if these civil vows apply to all of California, but there you have it. No religious crap.